To Patch a Visual Gap, Turn That Text Around

Example of visual fixations while reading. The text read is printed with fixations superimposed as gray disks. The diameter of the disk is proportional to the duration of the fixation.

Example of visual fixations while reading. The text read is printed with fixations superimposed as gray disks. The diameter of the disk is proportional to the duration of the fixation.

Reader, be proud. You’re a perceptual expert.

As you read, your eyes alternately focus and move along each line of text in a seamless sequence honed over years of practice. Reading, recognizing faces and distinguishing colors or musical tones are all forms of perceptual expertise.

To appreciate the visual skill involved in reading, turn a text upside down. You’ll stumble along in fits and starts, your eyes pausing longer and more often, each movement bringing less information to your brain.

To assess how such neuro-ocular blundering might be improved, researchers at the University of British Columbia asked seven volunteers to practice reading novels upside down. After 30 half-hour sessions over a period of 10 weeks, they gained an average of 35 words per minute in reading speed on inverted text.

This could be promising news for people with right hemianopia (hemi-uh-NOH-pee-uh), a condition that erases part of the right field of vision in both eyes. Any damage to the left occipital lobe of the brain, or the pathways connecting it to the eyes, can cause this disorder. Hemianopia, from the Greek for “half sight,” most often results from a stroke, but can also befall patients with multiple sclerosis, brain tumors or traumatic injuries.

Read more at Scientific American MIND

, , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply